Cipd recruitment and selection

The role of selection interviewing After a short-listing process, interviews are very widely used in the selection process, as demonstrated by our successive surveys of recruitment practices. Interviews can be structured in a number of ways, with the most popular method following contents of CVs and application form, according to our latest Resourcing and talent planning survey.

Cipd recruitment and selection

The role of selection interviewing After a short-listing process, interviews are very widely used in the selection process, as demonstrated by our successive surveys of recruitment practices. Interviews can be structured in a number of ways, with the most popular method following contents of CVs and application form, according to our latest Resourcing and talent planning survey.

For the employer, the interview is an opportunity to: For the candidate, the interview is an opportunity to: Despite their popularity as a selection method, evidence highlights the limitations of the traditional interview. Judgements can be made for a variety of reasons that differ between candidates and are not related to the job requirements.

Drawing on a range of research, Anderson and Shackleton summarise the common weaknesses of interviews: The self-fulfilling prophecy effect. Interviewers may ask questions designed to confirm initial impressions of candidates gained either before the interview or in its early stages.

Cipd recruitment and selection

Interviewers sometimes assume that particular characteristics are typical of members of a particular group. In the case of sex, race, disability, marital status or ex-offenders, decisions made on this basis are often illegal.

However, the effect occurs in the case of all kinds of social groups. The halo and horns effect.

Dates and Availability

Interviewers can allow the experience of interviewing one candidate to affect the way they interview others who are seen later in the selection process. Interviewers sometimes give preference to candidates they perceive as having a similar background, career history, personality or attitudes to themselves.

The personal liking effect. Interviewers may make decisions on the basis of whether they personally like or dislike the candidate. Structuring the interview can help improve its ability to predict performance in the job and a growing number of employers take this approach.

A structured interview means that: There is a risk, however, of having an overly rigid approach in which there is little opportunity to ask the candidate supplementary questions and the candidate does not feel at ease. So a balance needs to be made. Our behavioural science research suggests that to avoid instinctive or hasty judgements interviewers should pre-commit to a set of interview questions that are directly related to performance on the job and focus the interview on collecting information rather than on decision-making.

Insights from the interview should be supported by data from other methods where possible. Following up with candidates in a timely manner, and giving feedback following an interview demonstrates appreciation of their time and interest and enhances the candidate experience.

Psychometric testing The use of tests has become an important part of the selection process and can benefit the overall talent management process. Evidence suggests that standardised tests or tests of cognitive ability are good predictors of job performance, especially for occupations that require complex thinking, although test results should never be the sole basis for a selection decision.

Evidence on how well personality questionnaires or work sample tests predict job performance is mixed.

Explore our related content

See more in our report A head for hiring:The CIPD have done extensive studies and found that making judgments on an individuals characteristics and suitability for future employment is inherently problematic and that many 'normal' selection methods contain significant flaws.

Recruitment, Selection and Resourcing Talent is a highly effective course providing an overview of the recruitment, selection and resourcing process, including preparation for, and practical experience of, conducting interviews.

Recruitment involves attracting and selecting individuals into the right role.

Cipd recruitment and selection

Recruiting the right individuals is crucial to organisational performance, and is a critical activity, not just for the HR team but also for line managers who are increasingly involved in the selection process. The recruitment and selection process involves attracting and securing individuals to undertake particular or specific organisational roles.

Induction is concerned with ensuring newly appointed people acclimatise to their new role and working environment. CIPD members can see our Recruitment and selection law Q&As for more on the legal aspects of recruitment.

For information on standards relating to recruitment such as cost of hire and workforce planning, see our HR and standards factsheet. Recruitment and selection Send to a friend.

A head for hiring: the behavioural science of recruitment | Report | CIPD

How to plan your recruitment process and advertising. How to decide who to interview. How to manage the interview process. How to manage the hiring process. How to manage the induction process. How to manage probationary periods.

International resourcing and selection | Factsheets | CIPD