An analysis of the archetypal bad woman kalypso in homers odyssey

He is favored by the gods and respected and admired by the mortals. Even the wrath of Poseidon does not keep him from his homecoming. He is confident that he represents virtue even when a modern audience might not be so sure.

An analysis of the archetypal bad woman kalypso in homers odyssey

In other words, it is brimming with elements that seem deeply rooted in common human experience — elements that appear in much of the literature of the world, regardless of time, place, or culture. One example of archetypal events, situations, and characters occurs in Book XXIII, when Penelope tests the man who claims to be her husband.

She asks him questions about She asks him questions about their marriage bed — questions whose answers only her true husband could know.

Odysseus answers the questions successfully, and Penelope speaks as follows: This passage illustrates a number of common archetypes, including the following: Characters in myths and literature are often forced to pass tests before they can achieve their desires.

Often in myths and literature, one of the partners in a marriage is skeptical about a claim made by the other partner; often a TEST must be passed before the skepticism is allayed. This archetype is also often an ideal in myths and literature.

Since so much of the stability of human societies depends on true love between married partners, it is not surprising that genuine love between husbands and wives is often celebrated in myths and literature.

This is one of the most common and most deeply rooted of all human desires. This archetype is the natural partner of the preceding archetype.

Genuine love between two people — especially between a husband and wife — is often expressed, as it is here, by intimate physical contact. Although The Odyssey is the product of a time, place, and culture vastly remote from our own, most people today can easily relate to the kinds of behaviors and emotions described in the passage above.

Homer has managed, here as so often elsewhere, to employ archetypes that make his poem seem, in many ways, as familiar to people today as it was to the people for whom it was originally composed.An Analysis of Homer’s, The Odyssey Odysseus’ Notable Characteristics Odysseus is a person who has strong characteristics, but also major character flaws Because of his constant struggles with his ‘passions’ and reason he can be categorized as an epic hero.

The 'Odyssey' itself if a form of archetype. That being, an epic journey with various conventions, such as the 'hero' character, the crossing of water, obstacles, supernatural elements -etc.

As for specific archetypes in the odyssey, it's best to simply consider character archetypes. The Odyssey by Homer.

Home / Literature / The Odyssey / Characters / Kalypso ; Character Analysis (Click the character infographic to download.) Sometimes spelled Calypso.

What is an archetype in The Odyssey

The goddess who holds Odysseus hostage for purposes of sex. On the one hand, she sure is hospitable: she invites Hermes to "speak what is in your mind. My heart is urgent.

Women In The Odyssey. Through several of the female characters, Homer portrays women in three different ways. The first type of woman is the bad, disloyal woman, such as Cyltemnestra and Melantho the maidservant.

An analysis of the archetypal bad woman kalypso in homers odyssey

Other women are portrayed as the manipulative seductress, such as Calypso . Full Answer. Archetypes are recurrent symbols found in art and literature. In the Odyssey, the trickster archetype is found in the character of Penelope, Odysseus' wife. Because Penelope uses trickery to deceive her unwanted suitors.

Women In The Odyssey. Through several of the female characters, Homer portrays women in three different ways. The first type of woman is the bad, disloyal woman, such as Cyltemnestra and Melantho the maidservant. Other women are portrayed as the manipulative seductress, such as Calypso . Abstract. The defining characteristics of Odysseus in classical literature are interpreted in wildly different ways by different authors: he is portrayed as a hero in Homer’s The Odyssey, a villain in Sophocles’ Philoctetes, a self-serving opportunist in Sophocles’ Ajax, a deceitful figure in Virgil’s Aeneid, and a scoundrel in Euripides’ Hecuba. Analysis of Archetypes Once there was a woman who told a story. However, she had more than just an entertaining tale to tell. She chose common images that everyone would understand, and she wrapped her story around them, and in this way she was able to teach the people.

Then, with the mentor archetype, Odysseus' father, Menelaus, is a . Analysis of Archetypes Once there was a woman who told a story. However, she had more than just an entertaining tale to tell.

She chose common images that everyone would understand, and she wrapped her story around them, and in this way she was able to teach the people.

SparkNotes: The Odyssey: Character List